Sun definitions

sŭn
A star that is the center of a planetary system.
noun
1
0
The sun is the star that is the central object in the solar system. It is made up of 92% hydrogen, almost 8% helium and the rest is assorted elements.

An example of sun is what rises in the east and sets in the west each day.

noun
1
1
Sun is defined as to be exposed to the rays of the central object in the solar system.

An example of sun is to tan at the beach.

verb
1
1
The star around which Earth and other planets orbit. It provides heat and light to Earth. It has a mean distance from Earth of about 150 million kilometers (93 million miles), a diameter of approximately 1,391,000 kilometers (864,000 miles), and a mass about 333,000 times that of Earth.
noun
0
0
A star that is the center of a planetary system.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The radiant energy, especially heat and visible light, emitted by the sun; sunshine.
noun
0
0
A sunlike object, representation, or design.
noun
0
0
To expose to the sun's rays, as for warming, drying, or tanning.
verb
0
0
To expose oneself or itself to the sun.
verb
0
0
The star around which Earth and other planets orbit. It provides heat and light to Earth. It has a mean distance from Earth of about 150 million kilometers (93 million miles), a diameter of approximately 1,391,000 kilometers (864,000 miles), and a mass about 333,000 times that of Earth.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To expose to the sun's rays; warm, dry, bleach, tan, etc. in or as in the sunlight.
verb
0
0
To sun oneself.
verb
0
0
An East Indian annual plant (Crotalaria juncea) of the pea family, grown for its bast fiber used in making rope, bagging, cigarette papers, etc.
noun
0
0
Its fiber.
noun
0
0
Sunday.
abbreviation
0
0
Advertisement
Often Sun. A medium-sized, main-sequence star located in a spiral arm of the Milky Way galaxy, orbited by all of the planets and other bodies in our solar system and supplying the heat and light that sustain life on Earth. Its diameter is approximately 1,392,000 million km (865,000 mi), and its mass, about 330,000 times that of Earth, comprises more than 99 percent of the matter in the solar system. It has a temperature of some 5.7 million degrees C (28.3 million degrees F) at its core, where nuclear fusion produces tremendous amounts of energy, mainly through the series of reactions known as the proton-proton chain . The energy generated in the core radiates through a radiation zone to an opaque convection zone, where it rises to the surface through convection currents of the Sun's plasma. The Sun's surface temperature (at its photosphere ) is approximately 6,200 degrees C (11,200 degrees F). Turbulent surface phenomena analogous to the Earth's weather are prevalent, including magnetic storms, sunspots, and solar flares. The Sun was formed along with the rest of the solar system about 4.5 billion years ago and is expected to run out of its current hydrogen fuel in another 5 billion years, at which point it will develop into a red giant and ultimately into a white dwarf.
0
0
(Sun Microsystems, Inc., Santa Clara, CA, www.sun.com) A major manufacturer of Unix-based workstations and servers. In 2010, Sun was acquired by Oracle.It all began in 1981 when Bavarian-born Andreas Bechtolsheim was licensing rights to a computer he designed. Named Sun for Stanford University Network and using off-the-shelf parts, it was an affordable workstation for engineers and scientists. In that year, he met Vinod Khosla, a native of India, who convinced him to form a company and expand. Khosla, Bechtolsheim and Scott McNealy, all Stanford MBAs, founded Sun in 1982.Its first computers, the Sun-1 and subsequent Sun-2 were instant successes in the university market. Sun began to compete against its rival Apollo Computer, an east-coast workstation company, eventually surpassing it in sales (Apollo was later purchased by HP).Sun has been a major force in open systems. Its computers have always run under Unix, which was licensed from AT&T and then later purchased outright. Sun and AT&T had formed such a tight alliance for a while that a host of Unix vendors formed the Open Software Foundation (OSF) in 1988 to keep Sun from dominating Unix.In 1984, Bill Joy, head of R&D, designed NFS, which was broadly licensed and became the industry standard for file sharing. Sun later packaged its Unix components into a complete environment named Solaris, which it later ported to other platforms, including the Intel x86.Sun used the Motorola 68K CPUs in its products until it designed its own RISC-based SPARC chips, which it launched with the SPARCstation 1 in 1989. Having gone through many iterations, SPARC CPUs are also made by Fujitsu and other third parties via licensing arrangements (see SPARC).In the mid-1990s, Sun introduced the Java programming language and ushered in a new era for application development on the Internet (see Java and Java EE). See network computer and Sun-Netscape Alliance.
0
0
The star which the Earth revolves around and from which it receives light and warmth.
pronoun
0
0
(astronomy) A star, especially when seen as the centre of any single solar system.
noun
0
0
The light and warmth which is received from the sun.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Something like the sun in brightness or splendor.
noun
0
0
(chiefly literary) Sunrise or sunset.
noun
0
0
To expose to the warmth and radiation of the sun.

Beautiful bodies lying on the beach, sunning their bronzed limbs.

verb
0
0
To warm or dry in the sunshine.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To be exposed to the sun.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
The radiant energy, especially heat and visible light, emitted by the sun; sunshine.
noun
0
1
A sunlike object, representation, or design.
noun
0
1
To expose to the sun's rays, as for warming, drying, or tanning.
verb
0
1
To expose oneself or itself to the sun.
verb
0
1
Sunday.
abbreviation
0
1
Advertisement
The self-luminous, gaseous central star of the solar system: magnitude, −26.74; mean distance from the earth, c. 149.6 million km (c. 93 million mi); diameter, c. 1.4 million km (c. 864,000 mi); mass, c. 332,000 times that of the earth; volume, c. 1.3 million times that of the earth; mean density, c. 0.25 times that of the earth; central temperature, c. 15 to 28 million degrees K; surface temperature, c. 6,000°K; rotational period, c. 27 earth days.
noun
0
1
The heat or light of the sun.

To lie in the sun.

noun
0
1
Any star, esp. one that is the center of a planetary system.
noun
0
1
Something like the sun, as in warmth or brilliance.
noun
0
1

Origin of sun

From Middle English sunne, from Old English sunne, from Proto-Germanic *sunnǭ (compare West Frisian sinne, Low German Sünn, Dutch zon, German Sonne, Icelandic sunna), from heteroclitic inanimate Proto-Indo-European *sh̥₂uén 'sun' (compare Welsh huan, Avestan genitive [script?] (xᵛə̄ṇg)), oblique of *sóh₂wl̥. More at solar.