Spam meaning

spăm
The definition of spam is to send out unsolicited mass marketing emails.

When you send a million people an email to try to make money online by selling them a worthless product, this is an example of a time when you spam.

verb
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Spam is a brand of canned ham, or mass marketing junk emails sent out to millions of recipients without their request.

Canned ham that you make a sandwich out of is an example of Spam.

An email promising you that you can make $1 million from a work-at-home opportunity, which was sent out to millions of people who did not ask for the email, is an example of spam.

noun
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A single piece of such e-mail.
noun
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A kind of canned luncheon meat made from pieces of seasoned pork and ham pressed into a loaf.
proper name
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Unsolicited e-mail, often of a commercial nature, sent indiscriminately to multiple mailing lists, individuals, or newsgroups; junk e-mail.
noun
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To send unsolicited e-mail to.
verb
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To send (a message) indiscriminately to multiple mailing lists, individuals, or newsgroups.
verb
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Unsolicited e-mail, often advertisements, sent out over a computer network to many addresses, usually indiscriminately.
noun
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To send such e-mail to (a user or users)
verb
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Unsolicited e-mail, or junk mail.The term refers to Hormel's ever-popular canned meat product made of processed pork and ham. The analogy supposedly is that junk e-mail is broadcast all over, just as the Hormel meat product spatters when hurled against a solid object with sufficient force. No one likes spam, the junk mail. Lots of people, on the other hand, love SPAM.
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Unsolicited, unwanted, impersonal email. A U.K.-based Spamhaus Project tracks the Internet’s spammers, gangs, and services, as well as provides spam protection for Internet networks. The Spamhaus Project team also partners with law enforcement agents to identify and catch spammers worldwide. This group says that email can be regarded as “spam” if it has all three of the following attributes: (1) the receiver’s personal identity is irrelevant because the email message sent is actually applicable to multitudes of other receivers; (2) the receiver has not given explicit consent for the email to be sent; (3) the sending and receiving of the email message appears to the receiver to give a “disproportionate benefit” to the sender. Spam wastes the time and the resources of the receivers. Spam also frequently includes material that many receivers find offensive, such as the marketing of sexual enhancement devices or child pornography. In the United States, spam reportedly costs nearly $21.6 billion annually in lost productivity, according to the 2004 National Technology Readiness Survey (NTRS). The survey, completed annually, tracks U.S. consumers’ online opinions and behaviors. The loss estimate of more than $21 billion was based on U.S. users’ reports that they spend an average of three minutes per day deleting spam at work. With about 170 million U.S. adults online at work, that results in 22.9 million lost hours a week, or $21.6 billion in lost productivity annually when the average wage is factored into the calculation. Early in 2005, Lycos Europe began offering computer users a weapon against spam-emitting servers. The weapon is actually a screensaver program that automatically visits the Website advertised in the spam. The idea behind this scheme is to have enough of these screensavers running to slow down the Website or make it inaccessible. Lycos Europe encouraged its 22 million users to download the screensaver for their own good, but, they affirmed, anyone who has a computer is welcome to download it. During the first week of February 2005, however, security experts warned that spam levels could increase drastically in future years because spammers have found a new way to deliver spam. Spamhaus said that a new piece of malware, a Trojan, has been created that gains control of a PC and then uses it to send spam through the mail server of that PC’s Internet Service Provider (ISP). Because the spam appears to come from the ISP, it is next to impossible for an anti-spam blacklist to stop it. Demon Spam-Filtering Service. Frequently Asked Questions. [Online, 2004.] Demon Spam-Filtering Service Website. http://www.demon.nl/eng/products/ services/spamfilterfaq1.html; Ilett, D. Spammers tricking ISPs Into Sending Junk Mail. [Online, February 2, 2005.] CNET Networks, Inc. Website. http://news.zdnet.co.uk/internet/ 0,39020369,39186364,00.htm; In Brief. Program Hits Spammers. The Globe and Mail, December 2, 2004, p. B11; In Brief. Spam Wastes $22.9 Million Hours a Week, Survey Finds. The Globe and Mail, February 9, 2005, p. C8.
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Tinned meat made mainly from ham by Hormel Foods Corporation.
pronoun
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A trademark for a canned meat product consisting primarily of chopped pork pressed into a loaf.
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Unsolicited, unwanted junk e‑mail that is sent to thousands, or even millions, of people at the same time.
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Origin of spam

  • From Spam (probably inspired by a comedy routine on the British television series Monty Python's Flying Circus, in which the word is repeated incessantly)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Blend of spiced and ham
    From Wiktionary