Sook meaning

suk
(Australia, Atlantic Canada, New Zealand, slang, derogatory) A crybaby, a complainer, a whinger; a shy or timid person, a wimp; a coward.

Don"²t be such a sook.

noun
2
0
(Scotland, rare) Familiar name for a calf.
noun
1
0
(US dialectal) A call for cattle.
interjection
1
0
The mature female blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.
noun
1
0
(US, Eastern Shore of Maryland) A female Chesapeake Bay blue crab.
noun
1
1
Advertisement
Sook, an alternative spelling of souk, is defined as a Middle Eastern or African outdoor market.

An example of a sook is where people in the Middle East can go to purchase spices.

noun
0
0
noun
0
0
Alternative spelling of suck.
verb
0
0
(US dialectal) Familiar name for a cow.
noun
0
0
(Newfoundland) A cow or sheep.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(Australia, New Zealand) A poddy calf.
noun
0
0
(Scotland) A call for calves.
interjection
0
0
(Newfoundland) A call for cattle or sheep.
interjection
0
0
(Australia, Atlantic Canada, New Zealand, slang) A sulk or complaint; an act of sulking.

I was so upset that I went home and had a sook about it.

noun
0
0
Alternative spelling of souq (“Arab market")..
noun
0
0
Advertisement

Origin of sook

  • Probably from dialectal suck. Compare 19thC British slang sock (“overgrown baby"), British dialect suckerel (“suckling foal, unweaned child"), Canadian suck (“crybaby"), Canadian suck (“sycophant"). From 1933.

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably from suck. Compare sukey (attested 1838), Sucky (1844), Suke (1850); sook from 1906.

    From Wiktionary

  • English from 14thC, Scottish from 19thC. From Old English sÅ«can (“to suck"). See suck.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Arabic سُوق (sÅ«q). From 1926. See souq.

    From Wiktionary

  • Origin unknown. From 1950.

    From Wiktionary