Calf meaning

kăf, käf
Frequency:
Calf means a baby cow.

The small cow nursing from the mother cow is an example of a calf.

noun
7
4
Calf means the back part of the lower leg.

The part of the body accentuated by high heels is an example of calf.

noun
3
2
Calf means the baby of a large mammal like a seal or elephant.

The little whale swimming alongside its mother is an example of calf.

noun
1
2
A large floating chunk of ice split off from a glacier, iceberg, or floe.
noun
1
2
A young cow or bull.
noun
1
2
Advertisement
A young cow or bull.
noun
1
2
Calfskin leather.
noun
0
2
An awkward, callow youth.
noun
0
2
The fleshy muscular back part of the human leg between the knee and ankle.
noun
0
2
The young of some other large animals, as the elephant, whale, hippopotamus, seal, etc.
noun
0
2
Advertisement
A large piece of ice broken off from an iceberg or coast glacier.
noun
0
2
Leather from the hide of a calf; calfskin.
noun
0
2
(informal) An awkward, callow, or silly youth.
noun
0
2
The fleshy back part of the leg below the knee.
noun
0
2
One of the young of certain other mammals, such as moose, elephants, or whales.
noun
0
2
Advertisement
The fleshy muscular back part of the human leg between the knee and ankle.
noun
0
2
A young cow or bull.
noun
0
2
Leather made of the skin of the calf; especially, a fine, light-coloured leather used in bookbinding.
noun
0
2
A young elephant, seal or whale (also used of some other animals).
noun
0
2
A chunk of ice broken off of a larger glacier, ice shelf, or iceberg.

noun
0
2
Advertisement
A small island, near a larger island.

The Calf of Man.

noun
0
2
A cabless railroad engine.
noun
0
2
(informal, dated) An awkward or silly boy or young man; any silly person; a dolt.
noun
0
2
(anatomy) The back of the leg below the knee.
noun
0
2
The muscle in the back of the leg below the knee.
noun
0
2
Advertisement
kill the fatted calf
  • to make a feast of celebration or welcome: Luke 15:23
idiom
0
1

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of calf

  • Middle English from Old Norse kālfi possibly akin to calf (from its shape)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English cealf

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English cealf, from Proto-Germanic *kalbaz (compare Dutch kalf, German Kalb, Danish kalv), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷolbʰo 'womb, animal young' (compare Ancient Greek (Hesychius) δολφός (dolphós) 'womb', Avestan garəwa [script?] 'uterus', Sanskrit गर्भ (gárbha) 'womb'), from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (“to swell”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Old Norse kalfi, possibly derived from the same Germanic root as calf (“young cow”) (above).

    From Wiktionary