Sloom meaning

A gentle sleep; slumber.
noun
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A. 1853, Jane Ermina Locke, "Elia", in The Recalled: In Voices of the Past, and Poems of the Ideal, James Munroe and Company (1854), page 193.

To his castle’s portal, / At the morning gloaming, / Bore they all the mortal / From the battle’s foaming, / Of the white bannered warrior knight, / Cold in his armor slooming!

verb
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1900, Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr, The Maid of Maiden lane, Dodd, Mead and Company, page 181.

Then the doctor was slooming and nodding, and waking up and saying a word or two, and relapsing again into semi-unconsciousness.

verb
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1936, Esmond Quinterley, Ushering Interlude, The Fortune Press, page 66.

The afternoon sun painted amber patterns on the Turkey red hearthrug: the only splash of colour in the dun room. Potter sloomed in the arms of the chair.

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2001, Gemma O'Connor, Walking on Water, Berkley Publishing Group (2003), ISBN 978-0-515-13597-8, page 205.

He lay slooming half-asleep, half-awake, thinking about Tuesday afternoon.

verb
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(of plants or soil) To soften or rot with damp.
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Origin of sloom

  • From Middle English *sloume, sloumbe, slume, from Old English slūma (“sleep, slumber”), from Proto-Germanic *slūm- (“to be slack, loose, or limp”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lew- (“limp, flabby”). Compare slumber and Dutch sloom.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English slumen, slummen, from Old English *slūmian (“to slumber, sleep gently”), from Proto-Germanic *slūm- (“to be slack, loose, or limp”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lew- (“limp, flabby”).

    From Wiktionary