Sloom Definition

noun

A gentle sleep; slumber.

Wiktionary
verb
A. 1853, Jane Ermina Locke, "Elia", in The Recalled: In Voices of the Past, and Poems of the Ideal, James Munroe and Company (1854), page 193.
To his castle’s portal, / At the morning gloaming, / Bore they all the mortal / From the battle’s foaming, / Of the white bannered warrior knight, / Cold in his armor slooming!
Wiktionary
1900, Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr, The Maid of Maiden lane, Dodd, Mead and Company, page 181.
Then the doctor was slooming and nodding, and waking up and saying a word or two, and relapsing again into semi-unconsciousness.
Wiktionary
1936, Esmond Quinterley, Ushering Interlude, The Fortune Press, page 66.
The afternoon sun painted amber patterns on the Turkey red hearthrug: the only splash of colour in the dun room. Potter sloomed in the arms of the chair.
Wiktionary
2001, Gemma O'Connor, Walking on Water, Berkley Publishing Group (2003), ISBN 978-0-515-13597-8, page 205.
He lay slooming half-asleep, half-awake, thinking about Tuesday afternoon.
Wiktionary

(of plants or soil) To soften or rot with damp.

Wiktionary
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Origin of Sloom

  • From Middle English *sloume, sloumbe, slume, from Old English slūma (“sleep, slumber”), from Proto-Germanic *slūm- (“to be slack, loose, or limp”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lew- (“limp, flabby”). Compare slumber and Dutch sloom.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English slumen, slummen, from Old English *slūmian (“to slumber, sleep gently”), from Proto-Germanic *slūm- (“to be slack, loose, or limp”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lew- (“limp, flabby”).

    From Wiktionary

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