Shim meaning

shĭm
A thin, often tapered piece of material, such as wood, stone, or metal, used to fill gaps, make something level, or adjust something to fit properly.
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To fill in, level, or adjust by using shims or a shim.
verb
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A thin, usually wedge-shaped piece of wood, metal, or stone typically inserted under some part so as to level it or make it flush with another part.
noun
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To fit with a shim or shims.
verb
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Software that allows an older version of a program, framework or protocol to use the newer updated version. The shim may intercept a call to a programming interface (API) and convert the parameters, or it may hand it off to another routine. See polyfill.
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A wedge.
noun
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A thin piece of material, sometimes tapered, used for alignment or support.
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(computing) A small library that transparently intercepts and modifies calls to an API, usually for compatibility purposes.
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A kind of shallow plow used in tillage to break the ground and clear it of weeds.
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A small metal device used to pick open a lock.
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To fit one or more shims to a piece of machinery.
verb
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To adjust something by using shims.
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(informal, often derogatory) A person characterised by both male and female traits, or by ambiguous male-female traits, also called a he-she; transsexual.
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(informal, often derogatory) Hermaphrodite.
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Origin of shim

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Unknown; from Kent. Originally a piece of iron attached to a plow; sense of “thin piece of wood" from 1723, sense of “thin piece of material used for alignment or support" from 1860.

    From Wiktionary

  • From she +"Ž him.

    From Wiktionary