Sepsis meaning

sĕpsĭs
Systemic infection by pathogenic microorganisms, especially bacteria, that have invaded the bloodstream, usually from a local source. Sepsis is characterized by fever, increased number of white blood cells, increased heart rate, and other signs of widespread infection.
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Systemic infection by pathogenic microorganisms, especially bacteria, that have invaded the bloodstream, usually from a local source. Sepsis is characterized by fever, increased number of white blood cells, increased heart rate, and other signs of widespread infection.
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Sepsis, also known as a blood stream infection, is a body-wide illness that comes from bacteria or other toxins from an infection.

An example of sepsis is an illness that is a concern after surgery.

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A poisoned state caused by the absorption of pathogenic microorganisms and their products into the blood or other bodily tissue.
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A severe infection caused by pathogenic organisms, especially bacteria, in the blood or tissues. If untreated, a localized infection, as in the respiratory or urinary tracts, can lead to infection in the bloodstream and widespread inflammation, characterized initially by fever, chills, and other symptoms and later by septic shock .
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(pathology) A serious medical condition in which the whole body is inflamed, and a known or suspected infection is present.
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Origin of sepsis

  • Greek sēpsis putrefaction from sēpein to make rotten

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Ancient Greek σῆψις (sÄ“psis, “putrefaction"), from σήπειν (sÄ“pein, “to make rotten"), from σήψ (sÄ“ps, “a kind of lizard, also a kind of serpent whose bite was alleged to cause putrefaction").

    From Wiktionary