Semaphore meaning

sĕm'ə-fôr'
A visual signaling apparatus with flags, lights, or mechanically moving arms, as one used on a railroad.
noun
0
0
A visual system for sending information by means of two flags that are held one in each hand, using an alphabetic code based on the position of the signaler's arms.
noun
0
0
To send (a message) or to signal by semaphore.
verb
0
0
Any apparatus for signaling, as the arrangement of lights, flags, and mechanical arms on railroads.
noun
0
0
A system of signaling by the use of two flags, one held in each hand: the letters of the alphabet are represented by the various positions of the arms.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Any system of signaling by semaphore.
noun
0
0
To signal by semaphore.
verb
0
0
(1) A hardware or software flag used to indicate the status of some activity. See flag.
0
0
Any visual signaling system with flags, lights, or mechanically moving arms.
noun
0
0
A visual system for transmitting information by means of two flags that are held one in each hand, using an alphabetic and numeric code based on the position of the signaler’s arms.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(computing) A bit, token, fragment of code, or some other mechanism which is used to restrict access to a shared function or device to a single process at a time, or to synchronize and coordinate events in different processes.
noun
0
0
(intransitive) To signal using (as if using) a semaphore.
verb
0
0

Origin of semaphore

  • Greek sēma sign –phore
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Borrowed in 1816 from French sémaphore, coined in French from Ancient Greek σῆμα (sêma, “sign”), and -φωρος (-phoros, “bearing, bearer”), from φέρω (férō, “to bear, carry”).
    From Wiktionary