Rugby meaning

rŭgbē
(place, proper) Famous school for boys located in Rugby, England: founded 1567
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A kind of football popular in England, played by two opposing teams of usually 15 players: action is continuous and the oval ball may be passed laterally or backward, kicked forward, or carried: a forerunner of American tackle football, first played at Rugby school.
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(place) City in Warwickshire, central England.
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A sport where players can hold or kick an ovoid ball. The ball cannot be handled forwards and points are scored by touching the ball to the ground in the area past their opponent's territory or kicking the ball between goalposts and over a crossbar.

The scrum is a distinctive element of rugby.

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A town in Warwickshire, where the sport of rugby is thought to have originated.
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A borough of central England east-southeast of Birmingham. It is the site of Rugby School (founded 1567), where the game of Rugby was developed in the 1800s.
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A game played by two teams of 15 players each on a rectangular field 110 yards long with goal lines and goal posts at either end, the object being to run with an oval ball across the opponent's goal line or kick it through the upper portion of the goal posts, with forward passing and time-outs not permitted.
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Origin of rugby

  • After Rugby School, England

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • 1823: Named after Rugby School in Warwickshire where William Webb Ellis "˜with a fine disregard for the rules of football as played in his time, first took the ball in his arms and ran with it, thus originating the distinctive feature of the rugby game'. From the plaque at the school.

    From Wiktionary