Repertoire meaning

rĕp'ər-twär'
The range or number of skills, aptitudes, or special accomplishments of a particular person or group.
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The stock of songs, plays, operas, readings, or other pieces that a player or company is prepared to perform.
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All the musical or theatrical works of a particular category, or of a particular writer, composer, etc., available for performance.
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The class of compositions in a genre.

Has excellent command of the chanteuse repertoire.

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Repertoire is all the skills or remembered performances of a particular person.

An example of repertoire is someone knowing all the songs to Grease, Les Miserables and Cabaret.

An example of repertoire is the range of knots that a sailor can tie.

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The stock of plays, operas, roles, songs, etc. that a company, actor, singer, etc. is familiar with and ready to perform.
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The stock of special skills, devices, techniques, etc. of a particular person or particular field of endeavor.
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A list of dramas, operas, pieces, parts, etc., which a company or a person has rehearsed and is prepared to perform or display.

The conjurer expanded his repertoire with some new tricks.

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A set of skills possessed by a person. A collection of items.
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Origin of repertoire

  • French répertoire from Old French from Late Latin repertōrium repertory
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Borrowing from French répertoire, from Late Latin repertorium (“an inventory, list, repertory"), from Latin reperire (“to find, find out, discover, invent"), from re- (“again") + parire, usually parere (“to produce").
    From Wiktionary