Refractory meaning

rĭ-frăktə-rē
Frequency:
The definition of refractory is stubborn or hard to manage, or heat resistant.

An example of someone who is refractory is a person who refuses to listen to the rules.

An example of something refractory is a material like silica or alumina that are difficult to melt.

adjective
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Showing or characterized by obstinate resistance to authority or control.

Refractory children; refractory behavior.

adjective
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Difficult to melt or work; resistant to heat.

A refractory material such as silica.

adjective
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Resistant to treatment.

A refractory case of acne.

adjective
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One that is refractory, especially a material that has a high melting point.
noun
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Hard to manage; stubborn; obstinate.
adjective
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Resistant to heat; hard to melt or work.
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Something refractory; specif., a heat-resistant material used in lining furnaces, etc.
noun
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Resistant to treatment.

A refractory case of acne.

adjective
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Having a high melting point. Ceramics that are made from clay and minerals are often refractory, as are metal oxides and carbides. Refractory materials are often used as liners in furnaces.
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Resistant to heat.
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Obstinate and unruly; strongly opposed to something.
adjective
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Not affected by great heat.
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(medicine) Difficult to treat.
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(biology) Incapable of registering a reaction or stimulus.
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A material or piece of material, such as a brick, that has a very high melting point.
noun
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Of or relating to a refractory period.
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Origin of refractory

  • Alteration (influenced by adjectives in –ory) of obsolete refractary from Latin refrāctārius from refrāctus past participle of refringere to break up refract

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin refractārius (“obstinate"), from refractus, past participle of refringere (“to break up"). Originally refractary reanalysed after other adjectives in -ory

    From Wiktionary