Incorrigible meaning

ĭn-kôrĭ-jə-bəl, -kŏr-
Incapable of being corrected or reformed.

An incorrigible criminal.

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Difficult or impossible to control or manage.

An incorrigible, spoiled child.

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The definition of incorrigible is someone who is naughty or bad (or who engages in generally unacceptable behavior) and who cannot be corrected.

An example of incorrigible is a child who is always getting into trouble.

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One that cannot be corrected or reformed.
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Firmly rooted; ineradicable.

Incorrigible faults.

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Not corrigible; that cannot be corrected, improved, or reformed, esp. because firmly established, as a habit, or because set in bad habits, as a child.
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Incurably depraved; not reformable.

His dark soul was too incorrigible to repent, even at his execution.

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Impervious to correction by punishment or pain.

The imp is incorrigible: his bottom is still red from his last spanking when he plans the next prank.

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Determined, unalterable, hence impossible to improve upon.

The laws of nature and mathematics are incorrigible.

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(archaic) Incurable.
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An incorrigibly bad individual.

The incorrigibles in the prison population are either lifers or habitual reoffenders.

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An incorrigible person.
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Defective and impossible to materially correct or set aright.

The construction flaw is incorrigible; any attempt to amend it would cause a complete collapse.

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Origin of incorrigible

  • Middle English from Latin incorrigibilis in- not in–1 corrigere to correct correct

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Recorded since 1340, from Old French incorrigible (1334), or directly from Latin incorrigibilis (“not to be corrected”), from in- "not" + corrigere "to correct" + -ibilis "-able".

    From Wiktionary