Refraction definitions

rĭ-frăk'shən
The turning or bending of any wave, such as a light or sound wave, when it passes from one medium into another of different optical density.
noun
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The bending of a ray or wave of light, heat, or sound as it passes obliquely from one medium to another of different density, in which its speed is different, or through layers of different density in the same medium.
noun
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The bending of the rays of light from a star or planet, greatest when the star or planet is lowest in the sky, so that it seems higher than it really is.
noun
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The apparent change in position of a celestial object caused by the bending of light rays as they enter Earth's atmosphere.
noun
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The bending of a wave, such as a light or sound wave, as it passes from one medium to another medium of different density. The change in the angle of propagation depends on the difference between the index of refraction of the original medium and the medium entered by the wave, as well as on the frequency of the wave.
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The apparent change in position of a celestial body caused by the bending of light as it enters the Earth's atmosphere.
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Refraction is the bending of a light or sound wave, or the way the light bends when entering the eye to form an image on the retina.

An example of refraction is a bending of the sun's rays as they enter raindrops, forming a rainbow.

An example of refraction is a prism.

noun
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The deflection of a wave, such as a light or sound wave, when it passes obliquely from one medium into another having a different index of refraction.
noun
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The bending of electromagnetic waves caused by a change in the velocity of propagation (Vp) as they pass from a medium of a given density into a medium of another density at an oblique angle. The extent to which this phenomenon occurs is termed the index of refraction (IOR). See also IOR, reflection, and Vp.
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The bending of electromagnetic waves as they pass between materials with different refractive indices. Refraction is an important characteristic of optical systems. As light rays travel at a more perpendicular angle to the edge of a medium, they are refracted outside the medium rather than being reflected inside. See refractive index, total internal reflection and diffraction.
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(physics) The turning or bending of any wave, such as a light or sound wave, when it passes from one medium into another of different optical density.
noun
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(metallurgy) The degree to which a metal or compound can withstand heat.
noun
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The ability of the eye to bend light so that an image is focused on the retina.
noun
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Determination of this ability in an eye.
noun
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The ability of the eye to refract light entering it, so as to form an image on the retina.
noun
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The measuring of the degree of refraction of an eye.
noun
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The ability of the eye to bend light so that an image is focused on the retina.
noun
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Determination of this ability in an eye.
noun
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Origin of refraction

refract +"Ž -ion