Redound definition

rĭ-dound
To return; recoil.
verb
0
0
To have a result or effect (to the credit or discredit, etc. of someone or something)
verb
0
0
To come back; react; recoil (upon)
verb
0
0
(obs.) To surge up or overflow.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To contribute to an advantage or disadvantage for someone or something. [from 15th c.]
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(intransitive) To contribute to the honour, shame etc. of a person or organisation. [from 15th c.]
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To reverberate, to echo. [from 15th c.]
verb
0
0
To reflect (honour, shame etc.) to or onto someone. [from 15th c.]
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To attach, come back, accrue to someone; to reflect back on or upon someone (of honour, shame etc.). [from 16th c.]

His infamous behaviour only redounded back upon him when he was caught.

verb
0
0
(intransitive) To arise from or out of something). [from 16th c.]
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To roll back, as a wave or flood; to be sent or driven back.
verb
0
0
To have an effect or consequence.

Deeds that redound to one's discredit.

verb
0
1

Origin of redound

  • Middle English redounden to flow abundantly from Old French redonder from Latin redundāre to overflow redundant

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman redounder, Middle French redonder, and their source, Latin rÄ“dundō, from rÄ“ + undō (“surge"), from unda (“a wave").

    From Wiktionary