Provision meaning

prə-vĭzhən
Provision is defined as a supply of something or to the act of providing a supply of something.

An example of provision is food you take with you on a hike.

An example of provision is when legal aid provides legal advice.

noun
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A particular requirement in a law, rule, agreement, or document.

The constitutional provision concerned with due process.

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A clause, as in a legal document, agreement, etc., stipulating or requiring some specific thing; proviso; condition.
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The act of providing, or making previous preparation.

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To take preparatory action or measures.

A bank must provision against losses from bad loans.

verb
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To supply with provisions, esp. with a stock of food.
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A providing, preparing, or supplying of something.
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A preparatory arrangement or measure taken in advance for meeting some future need.
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(eccles.) Appointment to an office; esp., advance appointment by the pope to a see or benefice that is not yet vacant.
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An item of goods or supplies, especially food, obtained for future use.
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Money set aside for a future event.
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(law) A clause in a legal instrument, a law, etc., providing for a particular matter; stipulation; proviso.

An arrest shall be made in accordance with the provisions of this Act.

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(Roman Catholic) Regular induction into a benefice, comprehending nomination, collation, and installation.
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(UK, historical) A nomination by the pope to a benefice before it became vacant, depriving the patron of his right of presentation.

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To supply with provisions.
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A preparatory action or measure.

We must make provisions for riding out the storm.

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To supply with provisions.
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(accounting) A liability or contra account to recognise likely future adverse events associated with current transactions.

We increased our provision for bad debts on credit sales going into the recession.

noun
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To set up a telecommunications line or network for a customer. The term comes from the telephone industry, in which the telco was responsible for configuring their computers to switch customer lines into the appropriate networks. The term migrated to networking in general and refers to setting up user accounts, servers or other network-related equipment.Do It Yourself"User provisioning" or "automated provisioning" allows customers to set up their own services and make changes from a Web browser or other client interface without having to contact the telecom or network provider and wait hours, days or weeks for the final results (see cloud computing).A Very Old TermThe term is centuries old. Before ships would sail from Europe to the New World, they had to be "provisioned" with food, rope, weapons and instruments. See also user management and provisioning.
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Origin of provision

  • Middle English from Old French forethought from Latin prōvīsiō prōvīsiōn- from prōvīsus past participle of prōvidēre to foresee, provide for provide

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French provision, from Latin prōvīsiō (“preparation, foresight”), from prōvidēre (“provide”).

    From Wiktionary