Probation meaning

prō-bā'shən
A process or period in which a person's fitness, as for work or membership in a social group, is tested.
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Release of a person from commitment for insanity, subject to reversal in the event of a relapse into insanity.
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The suspension of sentence of a person convicted but not yet imprisoned, on condition of continued good behavior and regular reporting to a probation officer.
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Probation is a period wherein a person is tested to see if he can behave in a certain way or perform certain tasks in an acceptable manner.

A period when you are first hired for a job and tested to see if you can do it well is an example of probation.

When a judge sentences you to six months of being observed and having to comply with rules instead of going to jail after you are caught shoplifting, this is an example of probation.

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A trial period in which a student is given time to try to redeem failing grades or bad conduct.
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A testing or trial, as of a person's character, ability to meet requirements, etc.
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A period of time when a person occupies a position only conditionally and may easily be removed for poor performance.

You'll be on probation for first six months. After that, if you work out, they'll hire you permanently.

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A type of sentence where convicted criminals are allowed to continue living in the community but will automatically be sent to jail if they violate certain conditions.

He got two years probation for robbery.

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(archaic) The act of testing; proof.
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Proof.
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A procedure following conviction that permits the party found guilty to be released without doing prison time, subject to conditions that are placed upon him or her by the court. Violation of any of those conditions can lead to probation being revoked and the person being remanded to confinement.
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Origin of probation

  • Middle English probacion a testing from Old French probation from Latin probātiō probātiōn- from probātus past participle of probāre to test prove
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From French probation, from Latin probatio (“a trying, inspection, examination"), from probare, past participle probatus (“to test, examine"); see probate, probe, prove.
    From Wiktionary