Platinum meaning

plătn-əm
A silver-white metallic element occurring in alluvial deposits in sperrylite and nickel ores, usually mixed with other metals such as iridium, osmium, or nickel. It is ductile and malleable, does not oxidize in air, and is used as a catalyst and in electrical components, jewelry, dentistry, and electroplating. Atomic number 78; atomic weight 195.08; melting point 1,768.2°C; boiling point 3,825°C; specific gravity 21.45 (20°C); valence 2, 3, 4.
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A medium to light gray.
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A trademark for a certification indicating that a recording, such as an album of music, has sold a million copies.
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A silver-colored, malleable, ductile, metallic chemical element that is highly resistant to corrosion and tarnish, used as a chemical catalyst, for acid-proof containers, ignition fuses, jewelry, dental alloys, etc.: symbol, Pt; at. no. 78
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Designating a record, tape, disc, video, etc. which has registered sales of a specified number, as two million, or value, as $1,000,000
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A soft, ductile, malleable, silver-white metallic element that usually occurs with osmium, iridium, palladium, or nickel. It has a high melting point and does not corrode in air. Platinum is used as a catalyst and in making jewelry, electrical contacts, and dental crowns. Atomic number 78; atomic weight 195.08; melting point 1,772°C; boiling point 3,827°C; specific gravity 21.45; valence 2, 3, 4.
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(Platinum Technology, Inc., Oakbrook Terrace, IL, www.platinum.com) A major software vendor acquired by Computer Associates in 1999, with more than 160 data, systems and application software products to its credit. Founded in 1987, Platinum's key business areas were database and systems management, application life cycle, data warehousing, the Internet and Y2K compliance. Key alliances with HP, IBM, Intel, Microsoft and SAP helped the company expand to more than 40 countries.
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A metal that has a variety of uses in jewelry and industrial applications. Just over half of its demand comes from jewelry production, while automotive catalyst uses take up about one-third and chemical and petroleum refining takes up about 13 percent. The remainder of its demand comes from the computer industry and high-technology applications. Platinum is one of the world’s scarcest materials. Eighty percent of platinum supply comes from South Africa, about 10 percent from Russia, and the rest from North America. Futures and options contracts for platinum trade on the New York Mercantile Exchange, as well as other exchanges around the world. Platinum is the principal member of a six-metal group called platinum group metals (PGM). The other members of the group are palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, osmium, and iridium. All have chemical and physical qualities that make them vital industrial materials.
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Of a whitish grey colour, like that of the metal.
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Of a musical recording that has sold over one million copies (for singles), or two million (for albums).
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The metallic chemical element with atomic number 78 and symbol Pt.
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A whitish grey colour, like that of the metal.

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(music) A single or album that has achieved platinum sales, i.e. over 1 million or 2 million.
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Origin of platinum

  • New Latin from Spanish platina platinum platina

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Spanish platina (“little silver"), because platinum was found as an apparent impurity with silver.

    From Wiktionary