Melodrama meaning

mĕlə-drämə, -drămə
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(historical) A sensational or romantic stage play with interspersed songs and an orchestral accompaniment.
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Behavior or occurrences having melodramatic characteristics.
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Any sensational, extravagantly emotional situation, behavior, etc.
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The definition of melodrama is a creative performance or actions with lots of exaggerated emotion, tension or excitement.

A soap opera is an example of a melodrama.

A person who is constantly breaking up and getting back together with her boyfriend in emotional scenes is an example of someone who enjoys melodrama.

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(archaic, uncountable) A kind of drama having a musical accompaniment to intensify the effect of certain scenes.
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(countable) A drama abounding in romantic sentiment and agonizing situations, with a musical accompaniment only in parts which are especially thrilling or pathetic. In opera, a passage in which the orchestra plays a somewhat descriptive accompaniment, while the actor speaks; as, the melodrama in the grave digging scene of Beethoven's "Fidelio".
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(uncountable, figuratively, colloquial) Any situation or action which is blown out of proportion.
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Origin of melodrama

  • Alteration of melodrame from French mélodrame spoken drama that includes some musical accompaniment, melodrama Greek melos song French drame drama (from Late Latin drāma drama)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French mélodrame, the second element refashioned by analogy with drama; ultimately from Ancient Greek μέλος (melos, “limb", “member", “song", “tune", “melody") + δρᾶμα (drāma, “deed", “theatrical act"). Compare melodrame. Cognate to German Melodram and Spanish melodrama.

    From Wiktionary