Mackinaw meaning

măkə-nô
A short, double-breasted coat of heavy, usually plaid, woolen material.
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The cloth from which such a coat is made, usually of wool, often with a heavy nap.
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A flatbottom boat with a pointed bow and square stern, once used on the upper Great Lakes.
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Of or from Mackinac Island, formerly a center of trade with the Indians of the Northwest.
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Of or made of a heavy, napped woolen cloth, often plaid.
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A heavy, woolen cloth.
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A blanket made of wool formerly distributed to the Amerindians by the U.S. government.
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A cargo boat, with a large flat bottom and sharp ends, formerly used on the Great Lakes and the Missouri River (to a lesser extent, elsewhere).
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A schooner-rigged boat once used on the Great Lakes.
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Origin of mackinaw

  • After Old Mackinac , a fort on the site of present-day Mackinaw City in northern Michigan

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Representing an earlier colloquial pronunciation of Mackinac, a strait between Lake Huron and Lake Michigan, an island in the strait, and an important trading-post on the island; ultimately from Ojibwe mishinii-makinaang (“at the place of many snapping turtles").

    From Wiktionary