Loco meaning

lōkō
(music) A direction in written or printed music to return to the proper pitch after having played an octave higher or lower.
adverb
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(colloquial) Crazy.
adjective
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(western US) Intoxicated by eating locoweed.
adjective
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(botany) Certain species of Astragalus or Oxytropis, capable of causing locoism.
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(rail transport, informal) Locomotive.
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Mentally deranged; crazy.
adjective
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To poison with locoweed.
verb
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To cause to be mentally deranged; craze.
verb
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At the pitch written. Used chiefly as a direction.
adjective
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noun
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noun
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To poison with locoweed.
verb
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To craze.
verb
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Crazy; demented.
adjective
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From place to place.

Locomotion.

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To poison with locoweed.
verb
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To cause to be mentally deranged; craze.
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Origin of loco

  • < L loco, abl. of locus, place: see local

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Spanish crazy possibly from Arabic lawqā’ foolish feminine sing. of ’alwaq from lāqa to soften lwq in Semitic roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Italian loco from Latin locō ablative of locus place

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Spanish loco (“insane, crazy"), from loco (“loose"). From Arabic Ù„ÙŽÙˆÙŽÙ‚ (láwaq, “foolishness") or Ancient Greek γλαυκός (glaukos, “clear").

    From Wiktionary

  • Abbreviation of locomotive.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Wiktionary