Lawn meaning

lôn
Frequency:
The definition of a lawn is an area of short, mowed grass that is generally found in a park or around a home.

The grass in the front yard of your house is an example of a lawn.

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A plot of grass, usually tended or mowed, as one around a residence or in a park.
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A light, finely woven, cotton or linen fabric.
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Land covered with grass kept closely mowed, esp. in front of or around a house.
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The grass itself.

To mow the lawn.

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(archaic) An open space in a forest; glade.
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A fine, sheer cloth of linen or cotton, used for blouses, curtains, etc.
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(Local Area Wireless Network) An earlier acronym for a WLAN. See wireless LAN.
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An open space between woods.
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Ground (generally in front of or around a house) covered with grass kept closely mown.
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(biology) An overgrown agar culture, such that no separation between single colonies exists.
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(uncountable) A type of thin linen or cotton.
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(in the plural) Pieces of this fabric, especially as used for the sleeves of a bishop.
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A town in Newfoundland and Labrador.
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An unincorporated community in Pennsylvania.
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A town in Texas.
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An unincorporated community in West Virginia.
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Origin of lawn

  • Alteration of Middle English launde glade from Old French heath, pasture, wooded area lendh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English laun after Laon , a city of northern France

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Early Modern English laune (“turf, grassy area"), alteration of laund (“glade"), from Middle English launde, from Old French lande (“heath, moor") of Germanic or Gaulish origin, akin to Breton lann (“heath")"; Old Norse & Old English land

    From Wiktionary

  • Apparently from Laon, a town in France known for its linen manufacturing.

    From Wiktionary