Kenning meaning

kĕnĭng
A figurative, usually compound expression used in place of a name or noun, especially in Old English and Old Norse poetry; for example, storm of swords is a kenning for battle.
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As little as one can recognise or discriminate; a small portion; a little.

Put in a kenning of salt.

noun
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Present participle of ken.
verb
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In early Germanic, as Old English, poetry, a metaphorical name, usually a compound, for something (Ex.: “whale-path” for sea)
noun
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The tread of an egg; cicatricula.
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A metaphorical phrase used in Germanic poetry (especially Old English or Old Norse) whereby a simple thing is described in an allusive way, such as ‘whale road’ for ‘sea’, or ‘enemy of the mast’ for ‘wind’.
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Origin of kenning

  • Old Norse from kenna to know, to name with a kenning gnō- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old Norse, from kenna (“know, perceive”), from Proto-Germanic *kannijaną, causative of *kunnaną (“to know how”). Compare can, ken, keen.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, derivative of Middle English kennen (“to know, perceive”). Compare Danish kjending (“acquaintance”). More at ken.

    From Wiktionary

  • From ken (“to beget, bring forth”).

    From Wiktionary