Joule meaning

jo͝ol, joul
A unit of energy equal to the work done when a force of one newton acts through a distance of one meter.
noun
2
0
The International System unit of electrical, mechanical, and thermal energy.
noun
1
0
A unit of electrical energy equal to the work done when a current of one ampere is passed through a resistance of one ohm for one second.
noun
1
0
The basic unit of energy or work in the SI & MKS systems, equal to the amount of work done by a force of one newton acting through a distance of one meter.
noun
1
0
1818-89; Eng. physicist.
proper name
1
0
Advertisement
The SI derived unit used to measure energy or work. One joule is equal to the energy used to accelerate a body with a mass of one kilogram using one newton of force over a distance of one meter. One joule is also equivalent to one watt-second.
1
0
The definition of a joule is the basic unit of electrical energy, and is equal to the work completed when one ampere of current is passed through a resistance of one ohm for one second.

An example of joule is what a scientist would use to measure energy.

noun
1
1
A unit of energy in the MKS system. It is equal to 10,000,000 ergs in the CGS system. Surge protectors are often given joule ratings, but this refers only to the amount of energy they can absorb, not what gets through. See CGS system.
0
1
The work done when a force of one newton applied to a point moves that application point one meter in the direction of application. Joule is named for James Prescott Joule (1818
0
1
In the International System of Units, the derived unit of energy, work and heat; the work required to exert a force of one newton for a distance of one metre. Also equal to the energy of one watt of power for a duration of one second. Symbol: J.

The Greisen–Zatsepin–Kuzmin limit (GZK limit) is a theoretical upper limit on the energy of cosmic rays (high energy charged particles from space) coming from "distant" sources. The limit is 5×1019 eV, or about 8 joules. The limit is set by slowing-interactions of cosmic ray protons with the microwave background radiation over long distances (~163 million light-years). The limit is at the same order of magnitude as the upper limit for energy at which cosmic rays have experimentally been detected. For example, one ultra-high-energy cosmic ray has been detected which appeared to possess a record 50 joules (312 million TeV) of energy (about the same as a 60 mph baseball).WP.

noun
0
1
Advertisement

Origin of joule

Named after the English physicist James Prescott Joule.