James definitions

jāmz
A masculine name: dim. Jamie, Jim, Jimmy; fem. Jamie.
noun
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1566-1625; king of England (1603-25) & (as James VI) king of Scotland (1567-1625): son of Mary, Queen of Scots.
proper name
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1633-1701; king of England & (as James VII) king of Scotland (1685-88): deposed: son of Charles I.
proper name
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1811-82; U.S. writer on religion & philosophy: father of Henry & William.
proper name
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1843-1916; U.S. novelist, in England after 1876: son of Henry and brother of William.
proper name
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1847-82; U.S. outlaw.
proper name
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1862-1936; Eng. medieval scholar & writer of horror stories.
proper name
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1842-1910; U.S. psychologist & philosopher: exponent of pragmatism: son of Henry.
proper name
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River in Va., flowing from the W part southeast into Chesapeake Bay: 340 mi (547 km)
proper name
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River in E N.Dak. & E S.Dak., flowing south into the Missouri: 710 mi (1,143 km)
proper name
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1
One of the 12 Apostles. The son of Zebedee and brother of John, he preached in Spain and was martyred on his return to Judea.
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Traditionally regarded as the brother of Jesus, the author of the Epistle of James in the New Testament, and the first bishop of Jerusalem.
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One of the 12 Apostles.
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James is a male name.

An example of James is the first name of the United States President Madison.

An example of James is the first name of one of the twelve Apostles.

noun
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(biblical) The twentieth book of the New Testament of the Bible, the general epistle of James.
pronoun
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One of two Apostles, James the Greater and James the Less, often identified with James, brother of Jesus.
pronoun
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One of the twelve Apostles, Zebedee's son and brother of John: his day is July 25
noun
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One of the twelve Apostles, Alphaeus's son: his day is May 3
noun
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A brother of Jesus: Gal. 1:19; also, a book of the New Testament sometimes ascribed to him.
noun
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A male given name popular since the Middle Ages. Also a common middle name.
pronoun
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An English patronymic surname​.
pronoun
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Origin of james

The English New Testament form of Jacob, from Old French James, from Late Latin Iacomus, dialect variant of Iacobus, from Ancient Greek Ἰάκωβος (Iacōbos), from Ἰακώβ (Iacōb), from Classical Hebrew יַעֲקֹב (Yaʿăqōḇ).