Interleukin meaning

ĭntər-lo͝okĭn
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Any of various small proteins that are produced by a variety of cell types, especially T cells and other white blood cells, and that regulate many aspects of inflammation and the immune response, including stimulating the production of white blood cells and platelets.
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Any of a family of cytokines that are released by macrophages and other cells and stimulate the inflammatory response.
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A cytokine that is released by T cells in response to an antigen and that regulates the growth and differentiation of B cells, monocytes, and many types of T cells. It has been used experimentally to treat cancer.
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Any of a family of cytokines that are released by macrophages and other cells and stimulate the inflammatory response.
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A cytokine that is released by T cells in response to an antigen and that regulates the growth and differentiation of B cells, monocytes, and many types of T cells. It has been used experimentally to treat cancer.
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A cytokine released by T cells that promotes the proliferation of a wide variety of blood cell types.
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A cytokine released by T cells that promotes the proliferation of a wide variety of blood cell types.
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Any of a closely related family of polypeptides, derived from many cell types, that stimulate several components of the inflammatory response, including fever; lymphocyte activating factor.
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A glycoprotein lymphocyte product that stimulates the growth of T cells and is used experimentally in cancer therapy; T cell growth factor.
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Any of various small proteins that are produced by a variety of cell types, especially T cells and other white blood cells, and that regulate many aspects of inflammation and the immune response, including stimulating the production of white blood cells and platelets.
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Any of a family of cytokines that are released by macrophages and other cells and stimulate the inflammatory response.
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A cytokine that is released by T cells in response to an antigen and regulates the proliferation and differentiation of natural killer cells, B cells, and other T cells. It has been used experimentally to treat cancer.
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A cytokine released by T cells that promotes the proliferation of a wide variety of blood cell types.
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Any of a class of cytokines that act to stimulate, regulate, or modulate lymphocytes such as T cells. Interleukin-1, which has two subtypes, is released by macrophages and certain other cells, and regulates cell-mediated and humoral immunity. It induces the production of interleukin-2 by helper T cells and also acts as a pyrogen. Interleukin-2 stimulates the proliferation of helper T cells, stimulates B cell growth and differentiation, and has been used experimentally to treat cancer. Interleukin-3 is released by mast cells and helper T cells in response to an antigen and stimulates the growth of blood stem cells and lymphoid cells such as macrophages and mast cells. There are many other interleukins that are part of the immune system.
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(biochemistry) Any of a group of cytokine proteins important in the regulation of lymphocyte function.
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Origin of interleukin

  • inter– leuk(o)– –in

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition