Groin meaning

groin
A strong, low sea wall built at a right angle to the coast to reduce shoreline erosion, esp. of a beach.
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The curved edge at the junction of two intersecting vaults.
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(euphemistic) The genitals.

He got kicked in the groin and was writhing in pain.

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A small jetty extending from a shore to protect a beach against erosion or to trap shifting sands.
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To provide or build with groins.
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The hollow or fold where the abdomen joins either thigh.
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The lower abdomen, where the genitals are located.
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The sharp, curved edge formed at the junction of two intersecting vaults.
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The rib of wood, stone, etc. covering this edge.
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To build or provide with groins.
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The crease or hollow at the junction of the inner part of each thigh with the trunk, together with the adjacent region and often including the external genitals.
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The fold or depression of the human body that separates the trunk from the legs.
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The area adjoining this fold or depression.

He pulled a muscle in his groin.

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(architecture) The projecting solid angle formed by the meeting of two vaults.
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(geometry) The surface formed by two such vaults.
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A structure projecting from a beach to change the pattern of erosion.
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To deliver a blow to the genitals.

In the scrum he somehow got groined.

She groined him and ran to the car.

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(architecture) To build with groins.
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To grunt; to growl; to snarl; to murmur.

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The definition of groin is the area in between your legs under your abdomen and near the genitals.

The front part of the area of your body on which you wear underwear is an example of your groin.

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The crease or hollow at the junction of the inner part of each thigh with the trunk, together with the adjacent region and often including the external genitals.
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Origin of groin

From earlier grine, from Middle English grinde, grynde, from Old English grynde (“abyss”) (perhaps also "depression, hollow"), probably related to Proto-Germanic *grunduz; see ground. Later altered under the influence of loin.