Georgia meaning

jôr'jə
Southern state of the SE U.S.: one of the 13 original states: 57,906 sq mi (149,976 sq km); cap. Atlanta.
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Region in SE Europe on the Black Sea.
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A feminine name; dim. Georgie.
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A state of the southeast United States. One of the original Thirteen Colonies, it was founded in 1732 by a group led by the British philanthropist James Oglethorpe and named for King George II. Georgia ratified the United States Constitution in 1788. Atlanta is the capital and the largest city.
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Country in Transcaucasia, on the Black Sea: became independent upon the breakup of the U.S.S.R. (1991): 26,911 sq mi (69,700 sq km); cap. Tbilisi.
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Arm of the Pacific, between Vancouver Island & British Columbia, Canada: c. 150 mi (241 km) long.
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A country in Caucasus region of Eurasia. Official name: Georgia. Capital: Tbilisi.
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A state of the United States of America. Capital: Atlanta.
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A female given name.
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A country in the Caucasus on the Black Sea. It developed as a kingdom around the 4th century bc and reached the height of its prosperity in the 12th and 13th centuries. Ruled by both Turkey and Persia at various times, Georgia was acquired by Russia between 1801 and 1878. The region was briefly independent (1918–1921), but was invaded by the Red Army in 1921 and proclaimed a Soviet republic. It was joined with Armenia and Azerbaijan to form the Transcaucasian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic from 1922 to 1936, when it became a separate republic, known as the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic until declaring its independence in 1991. The capital and largest city is Tbilisi.
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Origin of georgia

  • Probably from the Persian designation of the Georgians as Gurjhān and the country as Gurjistan (compare modern Russian Грузия (Grúzija)), which stemmed from the Ancient Iranian and Middle Persian vrkān/waručān, possibly a variant form of varkân, "land of the wolves". In the West, the Persian and Arabic forms has been associated, through folk etymology, with the word Latin Georgius, from Ancient Greek Γεώργιος (georgios, “farmer”), and have been sometimes connected to the name of Saint George, itself from Ancient Greek Γεώργιος (georgios, “farmer”).
    From Wiktionary
  • Latinate feminine form of George, from Ancient Greek Γεώργιος (georgios, “farmer”).
    From Wiktionary
  • Named for King George II of Great Britain.
    From Wiktionary