Gallium meaning

gălē-əm
A rare metallic element that is liquid near room temperature, expands on solidifying, and is found as a trace element in coal, bauxite, and other minerals. It is used in semiconductor technology, as a component of various low-melting alloys, and in producing blue light-emitting diodes. Atomic number 31; atomic weight 69.72; melting point 29.78°C; boiling point 2,403°C; specific gravity 5.907; valence 2, 3.
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A bluish-white, metallic chemical element, often a supercooled liquid at room temperature, used in semiconductors, LED's, lasers, etc., and as a substitute for mercury in high-temperature thermometers: symbol, Ga; at. no. 31
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A rare, silvery metallic element that is found as a trace element in coal, in bauxite, and in several minerals. It is liquid near room temperature and expands when it solidifies. It is used in thermometers and semiconductors. Atomic number 31; atomic weight 69.72; melting point 29.78°C; boiling point 2,403°C; specific gravity 5.907; valence 2, 3.
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A chemical element (symbol Ga) with an atomic number of 31; a soft bluish metal.
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Origin of gallium

  • From Latin gallus cock punning translation of surname of Paul Émile Lecoq de Boisbaudran (1838–1912), French chemist and element's discoverer French le the French coq rooster

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Named by its discoverer Lecoq, after Latin Gallia (“Gaul”). It was claimed that Lecoq had named the element after himself, since gallus is the Latin translation of the French le coq, but Lecoq denied this in an article of 1877.

    From Wiktionary