Fig meaning

fĭg
A trivial or contemptible amount.

Not worth a fig.

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Any of various trees or shrubs of the genus Ficus, especially F. carica, native to the Mediterranean region and widely cultivated for its edible multiple fruit.
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The sweet, hollow, pear-shaped, multiple fruit of this plant, having many tiny seedlike fruits.
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Any of several plants bearing similar fruit.
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The fruit of such a plant.
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Dress; array.

In full fig.

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Physical condition; shape.

In fine fig.

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Figurative.
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Figuratively.
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Figure.
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The hollow, pear-shaped false fruit (syconium) of the fig tree, with sweet, pulpy flesh containing numerous tiny, seedlike true fruits (achenes)
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Any of a genus (Ficus) of fig-bearing trees of the mulberry family, esp. any of the many cultivated varieties of a tree (F. carica) bearing edible figs.
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A trifling amount; little bit.

Not worth a fig.

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A gesture of contempt or disdain made as by placing the thumb between the first two fingers or under the upper teeth.
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To dress showily.
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Dress; appearance.
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Shape; condition.
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Figurative.
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Figuratively.
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Figure(s)
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A fruit-bearing tree or shrub of the genus Ficus that is native mainly to the tropics.
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The fruit of the fig tree, pear-shaped and containing many small seeds.
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A small piece of tobacco.
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The value of a fig, practically nothing; a fico; a whit.
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(obsolete) To insult with a fico, or contemptuous motion.
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(obsolete) To put into the head of, as something useless or contemptible.

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(intransitive) To move suddenly or quickly; rove about.
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Abbreviation of figure (diagram or illustration).
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Origin of fig

From Middle English fige, fygge (also fyke, from Old English fīc, see fike), from Anglo-Norman figue, from Old Provençal figa, from Vulgar Latin fīca (“fig”), from Latin fīcus (“fig tree”), from a pre-Indo European language, perhaps Phoenician [script?] (pagh, “ripe fig”) (compare Classical Hebrew פַּגָּה (paggâ, “early fallen fig”), Classical Syriac ܦܓܐ (paggāʾ), dialectal Arabic - (faġġ), [script?] (fiġġ)).