Escheat meaning

ĭs-chēt
Frequency:
Reversion of land held under feudal tenure to the manor in the absence of legal heirs or claimants.
noun
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To revert or cause to revert by escheat.
verb
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The reverting of property to the lord of the manor (in feudal law), to the crown (in England), or to the government (in the U.S.) when there are no legal heirs.
noun
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Property so reverting.
noun
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To cause to escheat; confiscate.
verb
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To revert or go by escheat.
verb
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The transfer of property to government ownership when its owner dies without a will or any heirs; property that is so transferred.
noun
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(law) The return of property of a deceased person to the state (originally to a feudal lord) where there are no legal heirs or claimants.
noun
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(law) The property so reverted.
noun
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That which falls to one; a reversion or return.
noun
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(of property) To revert to a state or lord because its previous owner died without an heir.
verb
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Origin of escheat

  • Middle English eschete from Old French (from escheoir to fall out) and from Anglo-Latin escheta both from Vulgar Latin excadēre to fall out Latin ex- ex- Latin cadere to fall kad- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English eschete, from Anglo-Norman escheat, Old French eschet, escheit, escheoit (“that which falls to one”), from the past participle of eschoir (“to fall”), from Vulgar Latin *excadō, from Latin ex + cadō (“I fall”).

    From Wiktionary