Electrode meaning

ĭ-lĕktrōd
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A solid electric conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves an electrolytic cell or other medium.
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A collector or emitter of electric charge or of electric-charge carriers, as in a semiconducting device.
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Any terminal that conducts an electric current into or away from various conducting substances in a circuit, as the anode or cathode in a battery or the carbons in an arc lamp, or that emits, collects, or controls the flow of electrons in an electron tube, as the cathode, plate, or grid.
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A conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves a substance (or a vacuum) whose electrical characteristics are being measured, used, or manipulated. Electrodes can be used to detect electrical activity such as brain waves. Terminal points in electrical components such as transistors, diodes, and batteries are electrodes.
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A device that emits, controls or receives electricity. Typically an end point or wire made of metal or some composite material, there are countless electrodes in electrical and electronics products. For example, in a vacuum tube, the cathode emitter is a "negative" electrode. The transparent wires made of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) that cross an LCD screen are electrodes. See battery, air interface and cathode.
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The terminal through which electric current passes between metallic and nonmetallic parts of an electric circuit.
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Origin of electrode

  • The word was coined by the scientist Michael Faraday from the Ancient Greek words ἤλεκτρον (ēlektron, “amber”) (from which the word electricity is derived) and ὁδός (hodos, “way”).

    From Wiktionary