Eighty-six meaning

ātē-sĭks
(colloquial) To cancel an order for food.

"eighty-six the ham and eggs for table two!"

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To refuse to serve (an unwelcome customer) at a bar or restaurant.
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To eject from, or refuse to serve at, a place where alcoholic drinks are sold, as because of drunkenness.
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To cut off, eject, cancel, eliminate, kill, etc.
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(colloquial) To remove an item from the menu.

Eighty-six the lobster bisque - we won't have the lobster delivery until tomorrow.

"Yes, I'd like the tomato soup." / "I'm sorry sir, that's been eighty-sixed - would you like a salad instead?"

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(colloquial) To remove or eject, as a disruptive customer.

Ryan and his friends got too rowdy at the bar, so they were eighty-sixed.

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(colloquial) To throw out; discard.

"We finally had to eighty-six that old printer after it jammed one too many times."

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Origin of eighty-six

  • Probably from waiters' and bartenders' slang of the 1920s and 1930s originally used to indicate that an item on the menu was not available perhaps rhyming slang for nix

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Unknown for certain. Possibly rhyming slang for nix (“cancel, say no to") (given by the OED), or possibly part of a code of such numbers, created in the 1920s.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Wiktionary