Eavesdrop meaning

ēvz'drŏp'
To listen secretly to the private conversation of others.
verb
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To secretly listen to or overhear a conversation without physically wiretapping a circuit. In medieval times, eavesdrop was rainwater that dropped to the ground from the eaves of a building. An eavesdropper was one who secretly hid in the area of the eavesdrop to overhear a private conversation. Contemporary electronic eavesdropping undoubtedly is a much drier and more comfortable endeavor. See also Echelon and wiretap.
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​To hear a conversation one is not intended to hear; to listen in.

I hope nobody was eavesdropping on our conversation last night, since it got so personal.

verb
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The dripping of rain from the eaves of a house.
noun
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The space around a house on which such water drips.
noun
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A concealed aperture through which an occupant of a building can surreptitiously listen to people talking at an entrance to the building.
noun
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The act of intentionally hearing a conversation not intended to be heard.
noun
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To eavesdrop is defined as to listen secretly to the private conversation of other people.

An example of eavesdrop is to listen to your neighbors' argument through a vent in your apartment.

verb
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To gain access to private electronic communications, as through wiretapping or the interception of e-mail or cell phone calls.
verb
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Water that drips from the eaves, or the ground on which it drips.
noun
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To listen secretly to the private conversation of others.
verb
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Origin of eavesdrop

  • Probably back-formation from eavesdropper one who eavesdrops from Middle English evesdropper from evesdrop place where water falls from the eaves from Old English yfesdrype upo in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • eaves +‎ drop, i.e. listening at the eaves of a building.
    From Wiktionary