Easement definitions

ēz'mənt
A right to make limited use of another's land, such as a right of way.
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The act of easing or the condition of being eased.
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Something that affords ease or comfort.
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An easing or being eased.
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Something that gives ease; a comfort, relief, or convenience.
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A legal interest in real property that grants the right to use in some specified manner the property of another.
  • The right to enter upon or pass over another's land.
  • A portion of land subject to such a right.
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A right of use of another’s land for a particular purpose; for example, an easement permitting a person to cross another’s land to fish in a pond located there, or use of a common driveway.
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An easement that grants another the right to perform certain related actions on the property.
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An easement that benefits another property; for example, a right to pass across land to reach a neighboring tract.
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A statutory or natural encumbrance that occurs in situations such as its being necessary to cross another’s land in order to gain access to water or to a road.
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An easement that benefits an individual who does not necessarily own any adjoining land; for example, an easement permitting someone to hunt or fish on the property.
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N An easement imposed by law where it is clear that the parties to a transaction intended an easement to exist, even if not specifically stated.
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An easement that prohibits the property owner from performing some action.
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An easement gained by the uninterrupted occupation of a another person’s land for a statutory period, often equal to that required for adverse possession.
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In law, a legal interest in real property that affords one the right to make limited use of the property of another for a specified purpose, which often is a right of way across the property. See also right of way.
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​(law) Legal right to use another person's property, generally in order to cross a part of the property, or to gain access to something on the property.
  • 2010, Marianne M. Jennings, Real Estate Law, page 75.
    The unrecorded document clearly granted an easement to the hallway and Watson had the document prior to closing.
  • 2002, William H. Pivar, Robert Bruss, California Real Estate Law, page 383.
    Pacific Telephone had an easement "for the stringing of telephone and electric light and power wires" over the property of Salvaty.
  • 1994, Theodore Steinberg, Nature incorporated: industrialization and the waters of New England, page 133.
    The Lake Company actually had an easement - a right to flood some of this land - dating from 1845.

The power company has an easement to put their poles along the edge of this land.

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(archaic) Relief, easing.
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(archaic, euphemistic) The act of relieving oneself: defecating or urinating.
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(architecture) A curved member instead of an abrupt change of direction, as in a baseboard, handrail, etc.
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Origin of easement

From Old French aisement.