Daisy meaning

dāzē
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One that is deemed excellent or notable.
noun
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Any similar member of the composite family; esp., the English daisy.
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Something excellent.
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The definition of a daisy is a type of flower with white petals around a yellow center, or a female name, or is slang for something very good.

An example of a daisy is a white wildflower used in a bouquet.

An example of Daisy is the female character on the television show "The Dukes of Hazzard" who was famous for her short denim shorts, called "Daily Dukes."

An example of a daisy is the best artwork in a gallery.

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(Digital Accessible Information SYstem) See DTBook.
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A wild flowering plant Bellis perennis of the Asteraceae family, with a yellow head and white petals.
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Many other flowering plants of various species.
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(Cockney rhyming slang) Boots or other footwear. From daisy roots.
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Any of several plants of the composite family, especially:
  • A widely naturalized Eurasian plant (Leucanthemum vulgare syn. Chrysanthemum leucanthemum) having flower heads with a yellow center and white rays.
  • A low-growing plant (Bellis perennis) native to Europe and widely naturalized, having flower heads with white or pinkish rays.
  • The flower head of any of these plants.
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A common plant (Chrysanthemum leucanthemum) of the composite family, bearing flowers with white rays around a yellow disk; oxeye daisy.
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The flower of any of these plants.
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A feminine name.
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A female given name.
pronoun
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A common name for a cow.
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push up (the) daisies
  • To be dead and buried.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of daisy

  • Middle English daisie from Old English dæges ēage dæges genitive of dæg day agh- in Indo-European roots ēage eye okw- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From the flower daisy, one of the flower names dating from the 19th century. Also a nickname for Margaret, since Marguerite and Margarita are identical with the French and Spanish word for "daisy".

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English dæġes ēaġe (“day's eye”) due to the flowers closing their blossoms during night.

    From Wiktionary