Coulomb meaning

ko͝olŏm, -lōm
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The SI derived unit used to measure electric charge. One coulomb is equal to the quantity of charge that passes through a cross-section of a conductor in one second, given a current of one ampere.
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A standard unit of electrical charge. Pronounced "kool-ahm," one coulomb (C) is equivalent to one amp of current flowing through a conductor for one second. It is also equal to 6.25 quintillion electrons (6.25 X 10 to the 18th). From French physicist Charles de Coulomb (1736-1806), who measured the behavior of electrical charges. See capacitance.
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The unit of electric charge equal to the quantity of electricity transferred by one ampere (A) in one second, a coulomb is the flow of 6.24
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Jewelry: pendant. From the homophone for Coulomb in Russian, кулон.
noun
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The basic unit of electric charge in the SI and MKS systems, equal to the charge of 6.281 × 1018 electrons; the charge carried by a current of one ampere in one second.
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The basic unit of electric charge, equal to the quantity of charge transferred in one second by a steady current of one ampere, and equivalent to 6.2415 × 1018 elementary charges, where one elementary charge is the charge of a proton or the negative of the charge of an electron. A coulomb's value in the International System differs very slightly from that in the meter-kilogram-second-ampere system of units.
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Of or relating to the Coulomb force.
adjective
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In the International System of Units, the derived unit of electric charge; the amount of electric charge carried by a current of 1 ampere flowing for 1 second. Symbol: C.

He is charged up with enough coulombs to make his hair stand on end.

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Origin of coulomb

  • After Charles Augustin de Coulomb

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowing from French coulomb. Named after the French physicist Charles-Augustin de Coulomb.

    From Wiktionary