Chevron meaning

shĕv'rən
A device shaped like an inverted V.
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A badge or insignia consisting of stripes meeting at an angle, worn on the sleeve of a military or police uniform to indicate rank, merit, or length of service.
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A V-shaped pattern, especially a kind of fret used in architecture.
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A heraldic device in the shape of an inverted V.
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An insignia consisting of a V-shaped bar or bars, worn on the sleeve as of a military or police uniform to show rank or service.
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A V-shaped pattern; used in architecture, and as an insignia of military or police rank, on the sleeve.
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(heraldry) A wide inverted V placed on a shield.
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(chiefly UK) One of the V-shaped markings on the surface of roads used to indicate minimum distances between vehicles.
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A guillemet, either of the punctuation marks “«” or “»”, used in several languages to indicate passages of speech. Similar to typical quotation marks used in the English language such as ““” and “””.
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(informal) A háček, a diacritical mark that may resemble an inverted circumflex.
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To form or be formed into chevrons.
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Origin of chevron

  • Middle English cheveron from Old French chevron rafter (from the meeting of rafters at an angle) probably from Vulgar Latin capriō capriōn- Latin capreolus young of the roe deer, rafter (from the resemblance of the rafters of a pitched roof to the forked antlers of the roe deer) from diminutive of caprea roe deer from Latin caper capr- goat
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Borrowing from French chevron (“rafter, chevron”), the mark so called because it looks like rafters of a shallow roof, from Vulgar Latin capriō, from Latin caper (“goat”), the likely connection between goats and rafters being the animal's angular hind legs.
    From Wiktionary