Casuistry definition

kăzho͝o-ĭ-strē
Frequency:
The determination of right and wrong in questions of conduct or conscience by analyzing cases that illustrate general ethical rules.
noun
15
4
Subtle but misleading or false reasoning; sophistry, often, specif., about moral issues.
noun
12
1
Specious or excessively subtle reasoning intended to rationalize or mislead.
noun
10
2
(pejorative) A specious argument designed to defend an action or feeling.
noun
6
0
The application of general principles of ethics to specific problems of right and wrong in conduct, in order to solve or clarify them.
noun
6
3
Advertisement
The process of answering practical questions via interpretation of rules or cases that illustrate such rules, especially in ethics.
noun
2
3
The definition of casuistry is the use of morals or beliefs in decisions of right and wrong in order to reach or rationalize a solution.

An example of casuistry is a Buddhist believing that something bad is happening to him because the universe is balancing his karmic debt.

noun
3
6

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
casuistry
Plural:
casuistries

Origin of casuistry

  • From casuist

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From casuist +‎ -ry. First recorded use in 1725.

    From Wiktionary