Cadmium definitions

kăd'mē-əm
A soft, bluish-white metallic element occurring primarily in zinc, copper, and lead ores, that is easily cut with a knife and is used in nickel-cadmium storage batteries, rustproof electroplating, nuclear reactor shields, solders, and in low-friction, fatigue-resistant alloys. Atomic number 48; atomic weight 112.41; melting point 321.1°C; boiling point 767°C; specific gravity 8.65; valence 2.
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A silver-white, malleable, ductile, metallic chemical element occurring as a sulfide or carbonate in zinc ores: it is used in some low-melting alloys, electroplating, rechargeable batteries, etc.: highly toxic dust or fumes: symbol, Cd; at. no. 48
noun
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A rare, soft, bluish-white metallic element that occurs mainly in zinc, copper, and lead ores. Cadmium is plated onto other metals and alloys to prevent corrosion, and it is used in rechargeable batteries and in nuclear control rods as a neutron absorber. Atomic number 48; atomic weight 112.41; melting point 320.9°C; boiling point 765°C; specific gravity 8.65; valence 2.
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A metallic chemical element (symbol Cd) with an atomic number of 48.
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Origin of cadmium

Latin cadmīa calamine (the ore of zinc from which cadmium was first extracted as an impurity) (from Greek kadmeia (gē) Theban (earth)) (from Kadmos Cadmus Cadmus) –ium