Buster meaning

bŭstər
Frequency:
One that breaks up something.

A crime buster.

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A broncobuster.
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A particularly robust child.
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A baby buster.
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Boy; man; fellow.
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A person, thing, or event that breaks or overpowers someone or something, often used in compound terms, as crime buster, ballbuster, blockbuster, and broncobuster.
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(informal) Fellow. Used in addressing a man or boy, especially out of annoyance.

Watch where you're going, buster!

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A person or thing that breaks, destroys, or incapacitates (a specified person or thing)

Budgetbuster.

affix
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(informal, often as a term of address) A guy, fellow; a friend.

Oi, buster, stop following me around everywhere!

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A loser, uncool person.

Stop being a buster.

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(performing arts) A staged fall, used in theatrical and film comedy.

Charlie Chaplin pulled a buster right before the closing credits.

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(US, dated, slang) Something huge.
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(US, dated, slang) A riotous, dashing young fellow.
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(US, dated, slang) A spree.
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anagrams
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(term of address) Alternative capitalization of buster.; guy, fella, buddy, mack.
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A male given name.
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A surname​.
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Origin of buster

  • ? var. of burster (< burst + -er), or < bust + -er

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • First used as a vocative, in USA, from Spanish busté, a dialect form of usted (“you”): compare the etymology at bozo.

    From Wiktionary

  • bust +‎ -er: agent noun of the verb bust.

    From Wiktionary

  • See buster

    From Wiktionary