Bray meaning

brā
The definition of a bray is the sound a donkey makes.

An example of a bray is the sound a donkey would make when kicked in the rear end.

noun
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To utter the loud, harsh cry of a donkey.
verb
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A sound resembling that of a donkey.
noun
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Bray means to make the loud, harsh sound of a donkey, or to talk loudly, or to crush into powder.

An example of bray is to laugh with the sound like a donkey.

An example of bray is to crush an aspirin with a mortar and pestle.

verb
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To crush and pound to a fine consistency, as in a mortar.
verb
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The loud, harsh cry of a donkey.
noun
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To sound loudly and harshly.

The foghorn brayed all night.

verb
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To emit (an utterance or a sound) loudly and harshly.
verb
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To spread (ink) thinly over a surface.
verb
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To make the loud, harsh cry of a donkey, or a sound, esp. a laugh, like this.
verb
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To utter loudly and harshly.
verb
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The loud, harsh cry of a donkey, or a sound like this.
noun
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To crush or pound into a powder, as in a mortar.
verb
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(intransitive) Of a donkey, to make its cry.

Whenever I walked by, that donkey brayed at me.

verb
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(intransitive) Of a camel, to make its cry.
verb
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(intransitive) To make a harsh, discordant sound like a donkey's bray.

He threw back his head and brayed with laughter.

verb
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To make or utter with a loud, discordant, or harsh and grating sound.
verb
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The cry of an ass or donkey.
noun
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The cry of a camel.
noun
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Any harsh, grating, or discordant sound.
noun
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(now rare) To crush or pound, especially with a mortar.
verb
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(UK, chiefly Yorkshire) By extension, to hit someone or something.
verb
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To spread thin, as ink.
verb
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Origin of bray

  • Middle English braien from Old French braire from Vulgar Latin bragere of Celtic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English braien from Old French breier of Germanic origin bhreg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French braire, from Vulgar Latin bragire, from Gaulish *bragu (compare Middle Irish braigid (“it crashes, explodes”), Breton breugiñ (“to bray”); akin to English break, Latin fragor (“crash”), frangere (“to break”)).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French breier (Modern French broyer).

    From Wiktionary