Apocalypse meaning

ə-pŏkə-lĭps
(proper) The last book of the New Testament; Revelation.
noun
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Apocalypse is defined as a group of Jewish and Christian writings such as the Book of Revelation, the last book in the Holy Bible, which predict events at the end of the world.

The Book of Revelation of the New Testament is an example of the Apocalypse.

noun
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The definition of an apocalypse is an event that causes a tremendous amount of damage, perhaps even so much damage that the world ends.

Armageddon is an example of an apocalypse.

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(Christianity) The events prophesied in the Revelation of John; the second coming and the end of life on Earth; global destruction. [from 19th c.]
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Any of various Jewish and Christian pseudonymous writings (c. 200 b.c.-c. a.d. 300) depicting symbolically the ultimate destruction of evil and triumph of good.
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A revelation. [from 14th c.]

The early development of Perl 6 was punctuated by a series of apocalypses by Larry Wall.

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(countable, biblical) The written account of a revelation of hidden things given by God to a chosen prophet.

Apocalypses of Adam and Abraham (Epiphanius) and of Elias (Jerome) are also mentioned.

pronoun
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A prophetic disclosure; a revelation.
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A disclosure regarded as prophetic; revelation.
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A cataclysmic event, esp. the sudden and violent end of the world.
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A disaster; a cataclysmic event. [from 19th c.]
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Origin of apocalypse

  • Middle English Apocalipse from Late Latin Apocalypsis from Greek apokalupsis revelation, Apocalypse from apokaluptein to uncover apo- apo- kaluptein to cover kel-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin apocalypsis, from Ancient Greek ἀποκάλυψις (apokalupsis, “revelation”), from ἀπό (apo, “away”) and καλύπτω (kaluptō, “I cover”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Ancient Greek ἀποκάλυψις (apokalupsis, “revelation”).

    From Wiktionary