Adder meaning

ădər
Frequency:
One that adds, especially a computational device that performs arithmetic addition.
noun
1
0
Any of several venomous snakes, especially a viper of the subfamily Viperinae.
noun
1
0
Any of several nonvenomous snakes, such as the hognose snake, often believed to be harmful.
noun
1
0
One who adds.
noun
0
0
An adding machine.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A computer circuit that performs addition.
noun
0
0
A small, poisonous snake of Europe; common viper (Vipera berus)
noun
0
0
Any of various other snakes, as the poisonous puff adder of Africa or the harmless milk snake of North America.
noun
0
0
Any of several venomous snakes, especially a viper of the subfamily Viperinae.
noun
0
0
Any of several nonvenomous snakes, such as the hognose snake, often believed to be harmful.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
An elementary electronic circuit that adds the bits of two numbers together.
0
0
A name loosely applied to various snakes more or less resembling the viper; a viper.
noun
0
0
(chiefly UK) A small venomous serpent of the genus Vipera. The common European adder is the Vipera berus. The puff adders of Africa are species of the genus Oecobius.
noun
0
0
(US, Canada) Any of several small nonvenomous snakes resembling the adder, such as the milk snake.
noun
0
0
The sea-stickleback or adder-fish.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Someone who or something which performs arithmetic addition; a machine for adding numbers.
noun
0
0
Something which adds or increases.

They sought out cost adders with an eye toward eliminating them.

noun
0
0

Origin of adder

  • Middle English from an addre alteration of a naddre a snake from Old English nǣdre snake

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English addere, misdivision of naddere, from Old English nǣdre, nǣddre (“snake, serpent, viper, adder”), from Proto-Germanic *nēdrǭ, *nadrǭ (“snake, viper”) (compare West Frisian njirre, Dutch adder, German Natter, Otter), from pre-Germanic *néh₁treh₂, variant of Proto-Indo-European *nh₁trih₂ (compare Welsh neidr, Latin natrīx ‘watersnake’), from *sneh₁- (“to spin, twist”) (compare Dutch naaien). More at needle.

    From Wiktionary

  • add + -er.

    From Wiktionary