Absorption meaning

əb-zôrpshən, -sôrp-
Absorption is defined as the process when one thing becomes part of another thing, or the process of something soaking, either literally or figuratively.

An example of absorption is soaking up spilled milk with a paper towel.

An example of absorption is when you memorize all 50 states by reading your text book and looking at a map.

noun
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The fact or state of being much interested or engrossed.
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The act or process of absorbing or the condition of being absorbed.
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An absorbing or being absorbed.
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The process by which one substance, such as a solid or liquid, takes up another substance, such as a liquid or gas, through minute pores or spaces between its molecules. A paper towel takes up water, and water takes up carbon dioxide, by absorption.
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The passing of nutrient material, medication, etc. into or through tissues, as the intestinal walls, the blood, etc.
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The movement of a substance, such as a liquid or solute, across a cell membrane by means of diffusion or osmosis.
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The taking up and storing of energy, such as radiation, light, or sound, without it being reflected or transmitted. During absorption, the energy may change from one form into another. When radiation strikes the electrons in an atom, the electrons move to a higher orbit or state of excitement by absorption of the radiation's energy.
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The irreversible conversion of some or all of the energy of an electromagnetic wave to another form of energy as a result of its encounter and interaction with matter through which it is propagating or upon which it is incident. Generally, the sum of the electromagnetic energy converts to thermal energy, i.e., heat, which transfers to the matter, and which results in some amount of signal attenuation. An electrical signal propagating through a copper conductor, for example, attenuates as some electromagnetic energy is converted to thermal energy due to the vibration of free electrons in the copper. Similarly, an optical signal propagating through a glass optical fiber (GOF) suffers some attenuation as the photons interact with the crystalline silicon dioxide and dopants that comprise the fiber and convert to thermal energy. Radio waves also suffer considerably from absorption, which in fact is used to advantage in microwave ovens. See also attenuation and propagation.
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The definition of absorption is the state of becoming engrossed after totally concentrating on something.

An example of absorption is being engrossed in your favorite TV show and not paying attention to anything else.

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Assimilate; incorporation. [First attested in the mid 18th century.]

The absorption of a smaller tribe into a larger.

The absorption of bodies in a whirlpool.

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(chemistry, physics) The imbibing or reception by molecular or chemical action, of radiant energy; the process of being neutrons being absorbed by the nucleus; interception. [First attested in the mid 18th century.]

The absorption of light, heat, electricity, etc.

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(physiology) In living organisms, the process by which the materials of growth and nutrition are absorbed and conveyed to the tissues and organs; taking in by various means, such as by osmosis. [First attested in the mid 18th century.]
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Entire engrossment or occupation of the mind. [First attested in the mid 19th century.]

Absorption in some employment.

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Mental assimilation. [First attested in the mid 20th century.]
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The natural lessening of radio waves due to atmospheric interference.
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A state of mental concentration.
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(electrical engineering) The retaining of electrical energy for a short time after it has been introduced to the dielectric.
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The taking on of by a shipping company of special charges by another without price increase.
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Origin of absorption

  • Latin absorptiō absorptiōn- from absorptus past participle of absorbēre to absorb absorb

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • First attested in 1597. From Latin absorptiō (“a sucking in”), from absorbeō (“absorb”).

    From Wiktionary