Ablution meaning

ə-blo͝o'shən, ă-blo͝o'-
The definition of ablution is the act of washing or cleaning yourself, especially if you are doing so as part of some religious ritual.

Baptism is an example of religious ablution.

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A washing or cleansing of the body, especially as part of a religious rite.
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The liquid so used.
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A washing of the body, esp. as a religious ceremony.
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The liquid used for such washing.
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The act of washing something.
  • (chemistry) Originally, the purifying of oils and other substances by emulsification with hot water; now more generally, a thorough cleansing of a precipitate or other non-dissolved substance. [First attested from around 1350 to 1470.].
  • The act of washing or cleansing the body, or some part of it, as a religious rite. [From mid 16th century.].
  • (literary or humorous, usually in the plural) Washing oneself; bathing, cleaning oneself up. [From mid 18th century.].
  • (Western Christianity) The rinsing of the priest's hand and the sacred vessel following the Communion with, depending on rite, water or a mix of it and wine, which may then be drunk by the priest. [from 17th c.].
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The liquid used in the cleansing or ablution. [From early 18th century.]
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(Orthodox Christianity) The ritual consumption by the deacon or priest of leftover sacred wine of host after the Communion.
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(plural only, UK, military) The location or building where the showers and sinks are located. [From mid 20th century.]
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Origin of ablution

  • Middle English ablucioun from Latin ablūtiō ablūtiōn- from ablūtus past participle of abluere to wash away ab- away ab–1 -luere to wash leu(ə)- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English, ablucioun (“cleansing of impurities”), from Old French ablution, and its source, Late Latin ablūtiō (“a washing away”), from abluō (“wash away”), from ab (“away”) + luō (“wash”).
    From Wiktionary