Abeyance meaning

ə-bāəns
The definition of abeyance is a temporary stop to something or a pause.

An example of abeyance is when construction has to stop because of rain but is scheduled to resume once it gets sunny again.

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The condition of being temporarily set aside; suspension.

Held the plan in abeyance.

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A condition of undetermined ownership, as of an interest in an estate that has not yet vested.
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The status of real property or of a position or title when its ownership or occupancy is not vested in any existing person or party.
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In legal terms an abeyance is defined as a situation in which the legitimate owner of a property is not yet known.

An example of abeyance is when a homeowner dies without leaving the house to anyone and his kids start to fight over it.

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Temporary suspension, as of an activity or function.
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A state of not having been determined or settled, as of lands the present ownership of which has not been established.
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A suspension of the title to real estate while the rightful ownership is being discovered.
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Temporarily setting aside, such as holding a plan in abeyance.
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An indefinite or temporary state of inactivity or suspension.
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An incomplete or undetermined state of existence.
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(law) Expectancy; condition of ownership of real property being undetermined; lapse in succession of ownership of estate, or title. [Late 16th century]

The proceeds of the estate shall be held in abeyance in an escrow account until the minor reaches age twenty-one.

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Suspension; temporary suppression; dormant condition. [Mid 17th century]
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(heraldry) Expectancy of a title, its right in existence but its exercise suspended.

The broad pennant of a commodore first class has been in abeyance since 1958, together with the rank.

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Origin of abeyance

  • Anglo-Norman variant of Old French abeance desire from abaer to gape at a- at (from Latin ad- ad–) baer to gape bay2

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • First attested in 1528. From Anglo-Norman abeiance (“legal expectation”), from Old French abeance (“desire”) from abeër (“to gape at, aspire after”), abaer, abair (“to desire”), from á (“to”) + baër (“gape”), bair (“yawn”), from Medieval Latin batare (“to yawn”).

    From Wiktionary