Van-de-graaff-generator meaning

văn də grăf
An electrostatic generator in which an electric charge is either removed from or transferred to a large hollow spherical electrode by a rapidly moving belt, accelerating particles to energies of about ten million electron volts.
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An electrostatic generator using a movable insulating belt to produce potentials of millions of volts.
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A type of electrostatic generator used to build up static electrical charge of very high voltages by transferring electric charge from a power supply to a spherical metal terminal. A high-voltage source transfers charge to a nonconducting conveyor belt, usually made of silk or rubber, which continuously redeposits the charge on the insulated metal terminal, where it accumulates. Even small Van de Graaff generators can accumulate a static charge of 100,000 volts; the largest, up to 10 million volts.
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(physics) A device in which an electric charge is built up on a large spherical electrode by means of a rapidly moving belt.
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Origin of van-de-graaff-generator

  • After Robert Jemison Van de Graaff (1901–1967), American physicist

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Named after its inventor Robert Jemison Van de Graaff.

    From Wiktionary