Valence meaning

-lən-sē
(psychology) A one-dimensional value assigned to an object, situation, or state, that can usually be positive or negative.
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The capacity of something to unite, react, or interact with something else.
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Valence is the ability of elements or atoms to combine to form molecules.

An example of valence is when two atoms of hydrogen combine with one atom of oxygen to form a molecule of water.

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(linguistics) The number and type of arguments that a lexical item, especially a verb, can combine with to make a syntactically well-formed sentence, often along with a description of the categories of those constituents. Intransitive verbs ( appear, arrive ) have a valence of one—the subject; some transitive verbs ( paint, touch ), two—the subject and direct object; other transitive verbs ( ask, give ), three—the subject, direct object, and indirect object.
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(linguistics) The number of arguments that a verb can have, including the subject of the verb in the counting, ranging from zero (for the likes of "It rains") to three (for the likes of "He gives her a flower").
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The number of binding sites of a molecule, such as an antibody or antigen.
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The number of different antigens contained in a vaccine, corresponding to the number of pathogens that it is active against.
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(psychology) The degree of attraction or aversion that an individual feels toward a specific object or event.
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A city of southeast France on the Rhone River south of Lyon. Settled in Roman times, it was captured by the Visigoths in ad 413 and the Arabs c. 730.
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The capacity of an element or radical to combine with another to form molecules, as measured by the number of hydrogen or chlorine atoms which one radical or one atom of the element will combine with or replace (e.g.: oxygen has a valence of two, i.e., one atom of oxygen combines with two hydrogen atoms to form the water molecule, H2O)
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Any of the units of valence which a particular element may have.
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(place) City in SE France.
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The number of binding sites of a molecule, such as an antibody or antigen.
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The number of different antigens contained in a vaccine, corresponding to the number of pathogens that it is active against.
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(psychology) The degree of attraction or aversion that an individual feels toward a specific object or event.
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A whole number that represents the ability of an atom or a group of atoms to combine with other atoms or groups of atoms. The valence is determined by the number of electrons that an atom can lose, add, or share. An atom's valence is positive if its own electrons are used in forming the bond, or negative if another atom's electrons are used. For example, a carbon atom can share four of its electrons with other atoms and therefore has a valence of +4. A sodium atom can receive an electron from another atom and therefore has a valence of −1. (In this book the distinction between positive and negative valences is ignored unless it is relevant.) The valence of an atom generally indicates how many chemical bonds it is capable of forming with other atoms.
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(chemistry) The combining capacity of an atom, radical or functional group determined by the number of electrons that it will lose, gain, or share when it combines with other atoms etc.
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(chemistry) The number of binding sites of a molecule, such as an antibody or antigen.
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(sociology) Value.
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Alternative spelling of valance.
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Origin of valence

  • Latin valentia capacity from valēns valent- present participle of valēre to be strong wal- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • (extract, preparation):, from Latin valentia (“strength, capacity") (1425)

    From Wiktionary

  • (combining capacity): from German Valenz (1884)

    From Wiktionary