Unitarian definition

yo͝onĭ-târē-ən
A person who denies the doctrine of the Trinity, accepting the moral teachings, but rejecting the divinity, of Jesus, and holding that God exists as one person or being.
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A Christian who is not a Trinitarian.
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An adherent of Unitarian Universalism.
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A monotheist who is not a Christian.
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A member of a denomination based on these beliefs and characterized by congregational autonomy, tolerance of differing religious views, absence of creed, etc.
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Of Unitarians or their doctrines, or adhering to Unitarianism.
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Espousing a unitary view of something.

The unitarian position on executive power.

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One who denies the doctrine of the Trinity, believing that God exists only in one person; a unipersonalist.
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One who rejects the principle of dualism.
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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
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A Christian who does not believe in the traditional doctrine of the Trinity.
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A follower of Unitarian Universalism; or a member of a Unitarian Universalist Church in North America who adhered to, or identifies with, the Unitarian part of that church prior to consolidation in 1961.
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(rare) A Muslim, Jew or other kind of monotheist who is not a Christian.
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A member of a certain political movement, especially the Unitarios of nineteenth century Argentina (known as the Unitarian Party in English).
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Pertaining to Unitarianism.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
unitarian
Plural:
unitarians

Origin of unitarian

  • From New Latin ūnitārius monotheist from Latin ūnitās unity unity

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Related to New Latin unitarius (from Latin unitas (“unity")) +"Ž -an. First documented as unitaria religio, in a decree of the Diet of Lécfalva (1600). In English since 1687

    From Wiktionary

  • unitary +"Ž -ian

    From Wiktionary