Unicorn meaning

yo͝onĭ-kôrn
Frequency:
A mythical horselike animal with a single horn growing from the center of its forehead.
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(historical) In various Bible translations, used to render the Latin unicornis or rhinoceros (representing Hebrew רְאֵם); a reem or wild ox.
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A mythical beast resembling a horse with a single, straight, spiraled horn projecting from its forehead.
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The constellation Monoceros.
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A heraldic representation of such a beast used as a charge or as a supporter; as in the arms of Great Britain and of Scotland.
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(bible) A two-horned, oxlike animal: Deut. 33:17
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Pegacorn, unipeg, unisus (“winged unicorn")
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A new company valued at more than one billion U.S. dollars before going public. In 2013, venture capitalist Aileen Lee named the high-profile startups "unicorns" in a TechCrunch article. Nearly 40 at that time, the number of unicorns topped 100 soon after.A unicorn is a mythological creature depicted as a white horse with a long horn on its forehead, it is said to have great power as well as be a symbol of truth and purity. Unicorns have also been portrayed as combination goat-horse animals. See decacorn.
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Origin of unicorn

  • Middle English unicorne from Old French from Late Latin ūnicornis from Latin having one horn ūnus one oi-no- in Indo-European roots cornū horn ker-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman unicorne, Old French unicorne, and their source, Latin Å«nicornis, from unus (“one") + cornu (“horn").

    From Wiktionary